Get More Out of Snorkeling
Get More Out of Snorkeling

The most basic beginner snorkeling gear is a mask, fins, and snorkel. It seems obvious but when starting out you still want to know how to use each item before buying it and to look for quality and not focus too intensely on price. Snorkeling is more fun when everything is in proper working order. No one wants broken tubes, straps, or fin cracks. It is a sport that can challenge you so why not put the odds on your side. You can pay under fifty dollars so it won’t break the bank. This means you can also replace parts at little cost, but if you buy right the first time, you won’t have to.

When you get more advanced and want to spend a bit more, you can opt for a full-face snorkeling mask that enables the diver to breathe through both the nose and the mouth (a feature of superior functionality) allowing for a more congenial underwater experience, so I highly recommend it unless you are a one-a-year practitioner. Some brands like HEAD have innovative designs that eliminate fogging (the bane of any diver’s existence) and enable you to see the underwater world with clarity and precision. It is an experience like none you have ever experienced before, so let the equipment do a lot of the work and let you have a clear field at all times. Most people like that the mask covers the entire face and thus keeps it perfectly dry. The top is engineered in such a way that water will not enter. What could be better than that?

It doesn’t end here. Snorkeling gear can get increasingly fancy as you commit to the diving sport. Buying some fins will allow you to power through the current with ease, saving your muscles from unnecessary strain. I personally love the durable design and adjustable heel strap for a customized fit. If you want comfort, you can have it. Those with latex allergies can buy them 100% latex-free. Don’t take your choice lightly. Some models with vented blades are conceived to reduce leg strain so you can conserve energy and stay in the water longer. Unless you are mighty man, these are important considerations.

A snorkel is not just a snorkel by the way. I like a low-profile shape for better vision and drag reduction. I want a consistent fitting so fit-point markets help. The material I trust is medical-grade silicone with a soft and flexible headband. I like to be able to pullout and unclick the device, then press the side button to separate the parts. I always want to maintain the proper head position and body alignment using the right model. Some snorkels come with good goggles that help you focus on your stroke technique and tempo. It is your choice. I also want to breathe without rotating, also an issue that pertains to body alignment. I don’t want to end my day with a headache so all these features matter. It is all about comfort and eliminating any pinching. You want the snorkel to sit close to the face for stability. Meanwhile, look for a streamlined shape that will help you cut efficiently through the water. Last but not least, ask about warping over time and discoloration. You get what you pay for.